Welcome to Altered Vistas
In the Comics - The Tenth Doctor
   Eleventh Doctor Contemporary Strips

Last update: June 2013

Jump to:          2010     2011     2012     2013          VIEW THE TIMELINE          VIEW THE INDEX

   Doctor Who (US)

 SPAM FILTERED

Issue 1 Cover A
Issue 1 Cover B
Issue 1 Hastings Exclusive
100 Penny Press Edition
I'm with Amy on this one...

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Andrew Currie (art), Charles Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUE: 1
COVER DATE: January 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
First Foot First - Sub-Species
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
The Professor, the Queen and the Bookshop - The Screams of Death
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 1: The Ripper, July 2011, and then again in August 2011 in a 100 Penny Press edition from IDW.

When Rory uses the TARDIS’ telephone to go online, the TARDIS is suddenly inundated with holographic spam mail and an annoying talking stapler. In order to get rid of it, the Doctor is forced to shut down all systems, causing the TARDIS to crash onto the planet Phayke. It will take three hours for the systems to reset, but unfortunately, as hard-light hologram Council Elder Image explains, the planet is due to be destroyed by the Scroungers in only one hour. The Scroungers want slaves, but Phayke’s population are all holographic and cannot leave the planet, so the Scroungers plan to destroy them instead. After an encounter with a phishing copy of the Doctor, the real Doctor bundles Amy and Rory into the TARDIS. He then meets with the representative of the Scroungers, who destroys Image. The Doctor gives him the slip but is once more confronted by the talking stapler, which gives him an idea. Aboard the TARDIS, the spam mail takes a nasty turn and Amy and Rory find themselves cornered by monsters. When the stapler appears, the Doctor suggests they listen to its advice. The stapler isn’t spam or junk mail, it genuinely wants to help, and it gets rid of the monsters. The Scroungers, meanwhile, have been hoodwinked by the phishing copy of the Doctor who, along with several other holograms, has promised them great wealth. They leave Phayke in search of promised riches.

Issue 1 RIB Cover
Issue 1 RIA Cover
Graphic Novel The Ripper, 2011

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
There’s some fun to be had here, the plotting is ingeniously detailed, the characterisation is pitch perfect, and the artwork, whilst obviously photo-referenced is generally very good with great likenesses and excellent use of colour, but the actual story amounts to very little - it’s like an episode from a science fiction sitcom - so ultimately this strip feels disposable and lightweight. By the way, I look forward to the day when an IDW release has more variant covers than it does actual pages.
 

 RIPPER’S CURSE

Issue 2 Cover AIssue 2 Cover BIssue 2 Cover RI
Issue 3 Cover AIssue 3 Cover BIssue 3 Cover RI
Issue 4 Cover AIssue 4 Cover BIssue 4 Cover RI

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Three artists on the first issue suggests production on this tale did not go smoothly, and the jump in style between artists is jarring. However, once Tim Hamilton takes over art duties fully, things settle down, even if his artwork is frequently rather scratchy and inaccurate and certainly not to my tastes. I find the muddy colour unappealing too. Storywise, the is quite strong, gaining momentum when Amy becomes one of the Ripper’s victims, but losing it a little at the end with the convenient time portal disposing of the villain. It’s a strong vehicle for Rory in particular, but the Doctor doesn’t really do very much, especially at the climax.
 

Elizabeth takes a licking...

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Richard Piers Rayner (art, Issue 2, pages 1-19), Horacio Domingues (art, Issue 2, pages 20-21), Tim Hamilton (art, Issue 2, page 22, then Issues 3 - 4), Phil Elliot (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee (Issues 2-3, Neil Uyetake (Issue 4)
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 2 - 4
COVER DATES: February - April 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Sub-Species - The Peace Strike
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
The Screams of Death - Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 1: The Ripper, July 2011

Whitechapel, London, 30 September 1888, and prostitute Elizabeth Stride is lured into Dutfield’s Yard where she is first paralysed and then murdered by a shape-shifting  alien. Her body is discovered at 1am. The TARDIS arrives moments later. The Doctor detects Kryon radiation from the Matrua Nebula with the sonic screwdriver and chases a man from the murder scene. He almost catches the man, who reveals himself to be a reptilian creature in a shimmer suit, Amy and Rory, meanwhile, passing themselves off with the psychic paper as Miss Marple and Inspector Clouseau, meet Sir Charles Warren. Amy realises that Elizabeth’s death was the work of Jack the Ripper, that this is the night of his double murder and that they can still save Catherine Eddowes. Leaving Rory to meet Inspector Frederick Abberline of Scotland Yard, Amy and a policeman race off. However, they are too late to prevent the murder and Amy disturbs the alien killer. It paralyses her, but she is saved by the Doctor. The killer escapes  and, as policemen arrive in Mitre Square, the Doctor is accused of the murder of Catherine Eddowes and, despite Amy’s protestations, arrested as Jack the Ripper.

Rory and a suspicious Abberline arrive in time to see the Doctor arrested, but Abberline realises the truth and has the Doctor released. Examining the body, the Doctor believes the creature is a Ju’wes who feed on adrenaline. The Doctor says the Ripper’s victims are fixed points in time - they cannot save any of them, and he has one more kill to make. However, their talk is interrupted by a policeman who has found a clue - writing on a wall which says ‘The Juwes are not the men tht will be blamed for nothing’. At the crime scene, they are observed by the shapeshifter who notes Amy’s name. Amy is determined that they can save the Ripper’s last victim and runs off to warn Mary Warner. Rory gives chase leaving the Doctor alone by the TARDIS where he is paralysed by the creature. It has detected his alien makeup and reveals that it is not a Ju’wes but a Re’nar, natural enemy of the  Ju’wes. Amy finds Mary Kelly at the Ten Bells Pub in Whitechapel but her story is dismissed. The Doctor, meanwhile, visits Sir Charles Warren, having realised he is really a disguised Ju’wes hunting the Re’nar killer. His chat convinces the Doctor that Mary Kelly can be saved and, using the TARDIS, he jumps ahead one month to the night of her murder. However, a long night staking out her home with Abberline (who reveals that Sir Charles resigned earlier that day) ends with a surprise - Mary Kelly, not Mary Warner is the Ripper’s next victim, and when Amy encounters the Re’nar, she learns that she will become his sixth.

Travelling to the present day, the Doctor and Rory discover that the Ripper now killed at least twelve, including Amy. Racing back to 1888, the Doctor realises they only have a short while before time accepts this new set of events as history. Amy, meanwhile, is being held captive by Mac’Atyde, the Re’nar, along with Mary Warner. He will kill her as a warning to the Doctor, then take his TARDIS. The TARDIS lands in Spitalfields, 1888, where they are met by  Abberline - and Sir Charles, who the Doctor persuades to reveal his true nature. Sir Charles says he will return the real Charles Warren once the Ripper has been caught and returned to his homeworld to stand trial for these murders and many more war crimes. Amy and Mary escape, just

as Rory and the Doctor locate them. In his reptilian Ju’wes form, Sir Charles attempts to apprehend Mac’Atyde, but the Re’nar reveals that he plans to suck all of London through a time portal, a crime for which the Ju’wes will be blamed.. The Doctor and Rory locate the portal device, but the Doctor cannot disable it, only minimise its effect. The Ju’wes sacrifices himself to push Mac’Atyde through the portal which then closes. Back in modern day London, the Doctor, Amy and Rory note that history is back on track, despite the wrong Mary dying, but the Doctor says the universe takes care of itself.

 A FAIRYTALE LIFE

Issue 1Issue 1 RIA
Issue 1 RIBIssue 2
Issue 2 RIAIssue 2 RIB
Issue 3Issue 3 RIA
Amy is grabbed by the Serpentines. Nasty.

SCRIPT: Matthew Sturges
ART: Kelly Yates (pencils), Steve Bird, Brian Shearer (1, sole credit for art 2-4), Rick Ketcham (inks), Rachelle Rosenberg (colour)
LETTERING: Neil Uyetake (1), Shawn Lee (2-4)
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 1 - 4
COVER DATES: April - July 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Chasing Rainbows - Missing in Action
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night - Apotheosis
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
A Fairytale Life, November 2011 (cover as first issue).

Amy wants to visit a fairytale kingdom so the Doctor takes her to Caligaris Epsilon Six in the year 7704, one of the most renowned holiday planets in the Earth Empire. Ignoring a warning light on the console, they venture out into the immersive experience, but something is wrong. Talking to two young boys called Joon and Elim have lost their sister Aurelia to the Serpentines, creatures that come from the skies and abduct anyone who is sick or hurt, taking them to the Dread Tower. The boys also have no knowledge of holiday planets, having lived here all their lives. The Doctor takes readings and realises he has arrived in the 79th Century - the holiday is long over. Aurelia’s father Sir Callum appeals to the king to let him go in search of his daughter, but the king refuses. However, the court wizard Gwydion sees the Doctor and Amy in his scrying crystal, and Sir Callum goes to detain them at once. Locating an access panel, the Doctor discovers that the planet is in quarantine - the warning light on the console was warning of biological contamination. They are apprehended by Sir Callum and Gwydion, but escape and run for the TARDIS. However, the TARDIS is no longer there.

The Doctor and Amy are apprehended by Sir Callum and

taken before the king, who is in discussion with Master Osric. Osric has dissected a dead fairy and discovered it to be a complex machine. The king will not allow the Doctor or Sir Callum to go to the Dread Tower to recover Aurelia, but places the Doctor and Amy, who is starting to feel unwell, into Callum’s c are. The Doctor learns that the king has ruled for generations and that the biological contamination, which the locals call the Pest, has no cure and affects only adults. Amy is abducted by the Serpentines. Meanwhile, Master Osric is killed as he experiments on the fairy. The Doctor persuades Sir Callum to disobey the king and accompany him to the Dread Tower. It is here that Amy has been taken, her injuries healed by a machine. However, it diagnoses her with Recombinant Yersinia Pestis and, for the safety of the population, sentences her to death.

Amy is saved by Aurelia. The king blames the Doctor for Osric’s murder and calls for his immediate arrest. At Sir Callum’s house, the Doctor has rewired a robotic duck to locate Amy. However, as they set off on their quest they are confronted by Gwydion. The Doctor disables his wizard staff with the sonic screwdriver and he and Sir Callum ride out. In the tower, Aurelia takes Amy to meet Ora and the other people imprisoned there. The Doctor’s robotic duck locates her and she is able to communicate with him, but the conversation is cut short when the Doctor and Sir Callum are attacked by first a chimera and then wyvurns, unicorns, gnomes and goblins. However, they eventually reach the Dread Tower and the gates open to reveal a fire-breathing dragon. But the dragon is controlled by the king who pulls a weapon on them both.

The Doctor identifies the Dread Tower as the main building of the theme park. The king has been using the advanced healthcare facilities to sustain himself for the 150 years of his reign. Whilst Callum fights the king, the Doctor, pursued by the dragon, runs into the main building to liberate the prisoners. There he meets up with Amy and Aurelia. They shelter in the master control room where the Doctor views the last entry in the immersive holographic security feed. This shows Chief Administrator Aethelred destroying the vaccine for the Pest, allowing the adults population to die and raising the children as the first generation of his loyal subjects. Leaving Amy in Aurelia’s care, the Doctor confronts Aethelred and learns that he did what he did to protect his people from the plagues, famines and wars ravaging the empire. Callum kills him leaving the Doctor to confront the dragon, but it is Amy with a large gun that finishes the robotic beast before collapsing. The Doctor carries her to the TARDIS, which was taken into the tower by scavenger drones programmed to remove anachronisms, and cures her in the TARDIS medical bay. Believing the king’s motives to protect the people from the horrors of the universe to be sound, the Doctor elects not to cure the disease or lift the quarantine, but Amy makes him realise that it is not his choice to make. He synthesises enough of the antibiotic to cure all the people before he and Amy depart.

Issue 3 RIB
Issue 4
Issue 4 RIA
Issue 4 RIB

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Whilst the likenesses of the Doctor and Amy aren’t always spot on, the artwork is generally bold and striking enough to get away with it, and the colour work is superb. A few double-page spreads and single panel pages really help to add a sense of drama and scale. The story itself is extremely engaging with some good twists and turns and some excellent characterisation. The Doctor and Amy are pitch perfect, but one-off character Sir Callum also comes vividly alive, and even the villain of the piece is given extra depth in his final moments because his reasons for doing what he did are actually honourable. All in all, an excellent comic strip - probably one of the best of its era.
 

 THEY THINK IT’S ALL OVER

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Mark Buckingham (inks), Charles Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Neil Uyetake
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUE: 5
COVER DATE: May 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
The Peace Strike - Reality Cheque
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
Forever Dreaming
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 2: When Worlds Collide, January 2012.

The Doctor, Amy and Rory try to travel to Wembley Stadium in 1966 to watch a football match between England and Germany. The TARDIS lands in the exact location - but in the 9th Century. The TARDIS crew, accompanied by Anglo-Saxons, visit Lord Wemba and his wife Frida, who thank the Doctor for helping King Alfred the Great escape from Somerset. Rangar the Strong, his son Henghist and several Vikings walk in to discuss peace with the Anglo-Saxons, but Henghist has other ideas. He plans to control the Anglo-Saxon ‘dogs’. His father hits him and tells him to obey him. Frida, away from the others, tells Amy that she and Rory should leave while they can, as Henghist has expressed great interest in her. Amy assures her she'll be fine. Meanwhile, Rory walks past a room where Henghist and Rangar are arguing. At the end of the argument, Rangar disowns Henghist and Henghist stabs his father in a fit of rage. Rory tells the Doctor, Amy and Wemba before Henghist enters and pretends that Rangar was killed by the Saxons. Henghist tries to take Amy and Frida as payment for his father's death, but the Doctor has another idea: he challenges him and one of his solders to a game of football. If he wins, he gets Frida, Amy and Wemba's land. If he loses, the Vikings leave. The Doctor and Rory win the football match, much to Henghist's displeasure. He wants to kill the women and burn the village, but Rory punches him, knocking him out cold. After their goodbyes, the TARDIS crew travel to Wembley Stadium 1966, to watch the World Cup

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
The Doctor’s claim that the TARDIS has landed ‘a thousand years too early’ is clearly wrong as that would set the story in 966 (ie. the 10th Century). The Doctor’s later assertion that only Wessex still resists the Vikings sets the date fairly firmly as 870, which is 1096 years before the England-German Would Cup of 1966. However, Ranger later talks about the Danelaw which wasn’t established until 886, so the history is quite shaky. Unfortunately, the story is pretty shaky too, seemingly more an excuse to celebrate football and Wembley and probably the fact that Matt Smith used to be a footballer. Forgettable, but the artwork is quite nice.
 

They think it's  all over. I wish it was...
Graphic Novel When Worlds Collide, 2012
Issue 5  Cover A
Issue 5 Cover B
Issue 5 Cover RI

 WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE

Issue 6 Cover AIssue 6 Cover BIssue 6 Cover RI
Issue 7 Cover AIssue 7 Cover BIssue 7 Cover RI
Issue 8 Cover AIssue 8 Cover BIssue 8 Cover RI
Graphic Novel When Worlds Collide, 2012

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
The artwork is somewhat crude, occasionally hampering the story (for instance, it’s not always clear that the Sontarans are supposed to be Sontarans, especially when they’re wearing period clothes, and the fact that Rok turns green at the end at first made me think that he was a Rutan, but there’s no clues in the actual artwork to back this up). Quite how Rok’s plan works - or what it even means - I have absolutely no idea as things seem to get rather muddled and confusing during the course of the adventure. I suspect there’s some nice ideas at work here, but the execution paired with poor artwork doesn’t help to put them across.
 

Kevin the Dinosaur

IMAGINARY FRIENDS - KEVIN
Kevin is an automated artificial intelligence (a robot) who just happens to be dinosaur-shaped. First and foremost an actor, Kevin joined the TARDIS crew in an attempt to broaden his horizons and find a better place to stay, though quite how something the size of a Tyrannosaurus Rex gets through the TARDIS doors is never properly explained. Your Destiny Awaits implies that Kevin travels in the TARDIS for just one week, having adventures in the Wild West with Sitting Bull, Los Angeles where he poses as a police detective, and an alien planet populated by blue-skinned aliens, Just before visiting Space Station E11 Nebula Base for the events of Space Squid, the TARDIS visited Tokyo, Japan, where Kevin was mistaken for Godzilla. Aboard Nebula Base, Kevin quickly established himself as a peace-keeping force, defeated the Space Squid and eventually joined the crew as the new security officer, ending his brief stint as a time traveller.
 

This is a Sontaran... just in case you wondered...

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Matthew Dow Smith (inks), Charles Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Chris Mowry (6), Neil Uyetake and Shawn Lee (7), Shawn Lee (8)
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 6 -8
COVER DATES: June - August 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Reality Cheque - The Moon of Lost Hope
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
Forever Dreaming - The Child of Time
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 2: When Worlds Collide, January 2012.

The Doctor, Amy and Rory are messing about in what appears to be the Wild West when they receive a visit from Rok Soo’Gar. Rok explains that they are on Multiworld, where, due to a fluctuation rift, he is able to craft using hard light holosettings and artificial animatronics any time his guests desire, all half a second out of phase with each other so they can co-exist in the same space. Showing them several of the time zones, Rok introduces them to Kevin, an automated artificial intelligence shaped like a T. Rex, but he is distracted by news of an unexpected ship approaching. The ship is a Sontaran warship, damaged in a battle with the Rutans, commanded by Major Drak of the 13th Sontaran Battle Fleet, who requests permission to land and make repairs. Rok grants him permission, but changes his mind when he learns they are venting fluronic gas, which could destabilise the fluctuation rift. However, Drak refuses to listen and brings his ship into land. There is a huge explosion and the time zones merge, distributing the Doctor, Amy and Rory in different places. Rory finds himself in a Wild West jail believed to be Billy the Kid and facing imminent hanging. The Doctor is in Prehistoric times, but the explosion has knocked Kevin into character and he is now a ferocious dinosaur. Amy, meanwhile, finds herself in a wartime Parisian cafe, but when the Gestapo arrive, they are Sontarans.

The Doctor is saved from Kevin by a woman on a flying carpet named Lisa Everwell, a holidaymaker from an Arabian adventure, but they are pursued by Caliph Sul’taran and his men... who are also Sontarans. Rory encounters Sontarans masquerading as Sonny Taran and his gang, but when he pulls a magic sword from a stone, they flee in fear. Unusual behaviour for Sontarans. Amy, meanwhile, is forced to flee when the Sontarans overhear her mentioning the Doctor. Both the Doctor and Rory witness the Sontarans suddenly vanishing, but it is the latter, shortly after befriending someone called Lisa, who discovers the TARDIS. Amy is found by another Lisa Everwell and also discovers the TARDIS in a Parisian backstreet. The vanished Sontarans are confronted by Major Drak. Each commander is a splinter of himself, but he has used the advanced technology at his disposal to teleport them all here - an invincible army ready to conquer the multi-world. Meanwhile, the Doctor, Amy and Rory all stumble into the TARDIS and realise they have all met Lisa. All of them have become fractured in time, the Doctor deduces, as more splinters of themselves pile into the TARDIS. The Doctors fire a beam of traganic energy into the middle of the fluronic particle matter, merging all the zones into one. However, stepping out of the TARDIS, the Doctor is greeted by Lisa - and twelve versions each of himself, Amy and Rory.

The Doctors argue about who should take command. When Kevin turns up, the Doctor uses his sonic screwdriver to return him to his affable self. They will need to do this to all the artificial intelligences because every Sontaran will also have been split into twelve - an army is coming. But he is concerned that Rok is nowhere to be found. The artificial intelligences argue amongst themselves until Rory, wielding his magic sword, manages to unite them, but Lisa warns that the Sontarans are already mobilising. Whilst Rory and the artificial intelligences defend the TARDIS, the Doctors attempt to set things to rights. One of the Lisas sacrifices herself so that Amy can get to the Doctor with vital information - whilst everyone else is split into twelve, there are thirteen different types of Sontaran. The Doctor heads out to confront the seemingly original Drak, in reality Rok who hoped the Sontaran ship would destabilise the rift thus allowing him to become an imaginator of an entire world. The Sontarans died at the moment of the explosion, leaving only shadows. However, they are substantial enough to take Rory’s sword and destroy Rok, returning the world to normal. Lisa takes over the running of Multiworld. Kevin elects to join the TARDIS crew.

 SAN DIEGO CONVENTION SPECIAL

The Doctor makes a convention intervention...

SCRIPT: Matthew Dow Smith
ART: Horatio Domingues (pencils), Andre Ponce (inks), Phil Elliot (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUE: Con Special
COVER DATE: July 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Missing in Action
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
Apotheosis
REPRINTS: None

The Doctor, Amy and Rory land at the San Diego Comic-Con to meet the creator of Rory’s childhood comic book hero Captain Rocket. The man in question is Hamilton Wilson, a figure once so beloved that copies of Captain Rocket were placed in the Explorer probes. However, whilst Rory is awed by him, a figure in impressive armour attempts to abduct Hamilton. They recognise the figure as an alien and, with Hamilton in tow, run for the service tunnels in the basement beneath the convention hall where they discover an alien device - a Trylonian brain-drain machine. Hiding in a cupboard, the Doctor asks Hamilton why aliens would be after him, but Hamilton says he has no idea - he’s just a washed up old has-been who nobody remembers. Almost caught by the aliens, they run back into the convention hall, but lose Hamilton in the crowd. Disguising themselves with costumes from the convention attendees, the Doctor, Amy and Rory return to the basement armed with fake guns. The aliens surrender and explain that the Trylonians conquered their world and absorbed their knowledge with a brain-drain machine like the one Hamilton is now strapped to. They want his knowledge and his stories to help them defeat the Trylonians, having found a copy of Captain Rocket aboard an Explorer probe. Hamilton says they don’t need to steal his stories, he’ll give them willingly to anyone who wants to listen. Hamilton takes off with the aliens aboard their ship for a new life among the stars. The Doctor is certain his tales will help to save a whole planet.

San Diego Convention Special

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
It would be churlish to criticise the story here. What it is is a love letter to Comic-Con for anyone in attendance, and as such it works very well, celebrating creativity and storytelling in general. The artwork is generally attractive, even if the likenesses aren’t especially good, but it has a definite appeal in its strong, crisp lines, and it’s Where’s Wally (or Where’s Waldo if you happen to be American) cover is wonderful.
 

   Doctor Who Annual 2011

 RUN, DOCTOR, RUN

Doctor Who Annual 2011 Cover A
Doctor Who Annual 2011 Cover RI

SCRIPT: Joshua Hale Fialkov
ART: Blair Shed
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’  Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

Exiting the TARDIS, the Doctor finds himself falling  upwards. He lands on top of an alien who accuses him of destroying his masterpiece. The alien’s audience  agrees. The Doctor is chased through a nightmarish Escher-esque landscape by the aliens who are gravitational shifters. The Doctor realises the aliens are living on a gaseous ball. He offers to fix it so that up is always up and down always down, but the aliens aren’t interested so the Doctor leaves.

An Escher world

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Aside from the desire to show lots of crazy space-bending Escher-style antics, I can’t really see a point to this strip. It’s also, at sixteen pages, much longer than it really needs to be. The artwork is very nice though.
 

 DOWN TO EARTH

They probably won't serve him in the local shop then...

SCRIPT: Matthew Dow Smith
ART: Mitch Gerads
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’  Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

Rural England and Harold Lumley returns home from the local shop to find the Doctor waiting for him. Using the sonic screwdriver, the Doctor disables Harold’s perception filter and demands to know who Harold really is and why he is here. The alien, Lum-Tee, is a Trylonian, a race with a habit of invading other worlds. Lum-Tee was engaged in a space battle against the Zorian homeworld when the TARDIS appeared and stopped the fighting. His ship damaged, Lum-Tee made it to Earth where he has spent fifty years rebuilding his ship. But Earth is now his home, why would he want to leave it or destroy it? However, he never lost the urge to fly, but he can’t because the villagers would all see and realise what he is. He would lose his friends. The Doctor makes some adjustments to the perception filter so that it covers not just Lum-Tee but also his ship. The locals see an old WWII fighter or a crop duster. The Doctor isn’t going to make Harold go home because it seems to him that Harold is already there.

Doctor Who Annual 2011 Cover A

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Complimented by beautiful artwork, this strip manages to pack quite an emotional punch with its simple message of finding the place where you belong. It has a very special atmosphere and the colour palette and use of light really helps to give it an air of lazy summer melancholy. The Trylonians also get a mention in the San Siego Convention Special.
 

Doctor Who Annual 2011 Cover RI
'Graphic novel' It Came from Outer Space, 2012

 TUESDAY

SCRIPT: Dan McDaid
ART: Dan McDaid, Deborah McCumiskey (colour assist)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’  Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

The Doctor is imprisoned in Gibraltar, 1958, by Sir Reginald Troupe, who plans to become King of England and Emperor of the World. Lashing up a device from objects in his cell, the Doctor contacts Amy, but she is leading a resistance force on the vanguard ship of the Vroon war fleet. Rory, meanwhile, is desperately trying not to be crowned as the king of England when Troupe and a force of Vroon warriors enter and demand his immediate execution. Troupe has made a pact with the Vroon - they can use Earth as a beachhead in their war with the Noorv in return for him taking what he believes is rightfully his. Amy, having taken the ship, contacts the Doctor who gives her some co-ordinates where she must fire the ship’s secondary pulse cannon. This blasts the wall of his cell allowing him to escape. Dodging guards he makes it back to the TARDIS and travels to St. Paul’s cathedral to confront Troupe. Troupe gives orders for the fleet to flatten London, but the fleet does not respond because Amy has staged a workers revolt aboard the ships. Troupe is arrested by the police, the workers’ rebellion took the Vroon soldiers away and everything was returned to normal. That was Tuesday.

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Revelling in its own absurdity, this witty strip manages to tell quite a large adventure in remarkably little space. The artwork isn’t to my taste, looking somewhat messy and occasionally making it difficult to see what’s going on, but we all have styles we like and dislike and the style here is at least appropriate to the tone.
 

Just another ordinary day in TARDISLand...

 YOUR DESTINY AWAITS

Doctor Who Annual 2011 Cover A

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Not so much a story as a prelude to Space Squid, but the artwork is very nice and it’s hard not to feel for Kevin, even as the strip highlights all the reasons why a comedy dinosaur aboard the TARDIS is probably not a good idea. Amy has just one line in the whole of this story.
 

Kevin has doubts...

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Josh Adams (art) Rochelle Rosenberg (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’  Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

After assorted adventures and mishaps in and out of the TARDIS, Kevin the Dinosaur confides in Rory. He still hasn’t found anywhere were he really fits in. Rory tells him he will find somewhere, he’ll find his destiny if he just keeps looking.

Doctor Who Annual 2011 Cover RI
'Graphic novel' It Came from Outer Space, 2012
   Doctor Who (US)

 SPACE SQUID

Issue 9 Cover AIssue 9 Cover B

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Josh Adams (art), Rachelle Rosenberg (colour)
LETTERING: Neil Uyetake
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUE: 9
COVER DATE: September 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Vacuum Packed - The Secret Star Trail
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
The Child of Time
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

Aboard Space Station E11 Nebula Base, acolytes of the Space Squid are gathering for the End of Days. The Doctor, Amy, Rory and Kevin arrive just as a sceptical Commander Katic and Major Fillion give docking permission for the ship ‘Heaven’s Tentacle’, containing the High Priest, to dock. The acolytes get restless and Katic orders the release of Petty Officer Dever to keep them under control. However, Dever is killed by a gunman and it is Kevin who steps in to maintain crowd control. The High Priest calls for control and summons the Space Squid. The Doctor reviews the security footage of the ship’s arrival and realises that the appearance of the space squid was carefully engineered. The creature is a Coleiodean, but much larger than a normal one. Coleiodeans love to suck brains, but not before they have controlled them. Rory and Amy, meanwhile, talk to the High Priest and learn that Dever was killed because he was the only non-human security on board. Just as the Doctor devises a plan to stop the squid, it exerts mind control over the whole station, leaving only the Doctor and Kevin immune. Rory and Amy are given the bomb that will destroy the station. The Doctor, declaring himself the Anti-Squid calls for a meeting, then quickly gets the pieces of his plan in order, including making Kevin a set of body armour. Meeting with the Priest, the Doctor restores Amy and Rory to normal, proving that the squid is over-stretching itself. Kevin flies in to distract it further and, when it screams, he inserts a syringe into its tongue, rendering it unconscious. The threat over and the squid destined for a distant world, Kevin elects to remain on the station as the new security officer.

Issue 9 Cover RI'Graphic novel' It Came from Outer Space, 2012
Anti-squid.

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
The artwork is generally very good and the likenesses extremely accurate, though the overall style sometimes suffers by losing the backgrounds and thus showing characters floating in a void. Beep the Meep gets a name check, which is cute, but this story really doesn’t amount to much. It appears to have no point other than to get rid of Kevin, all the station characters are thoroughly underdeveloped and the conclusion is something of a letdown too. It doesn’t even have anything to say about religion. Disappointing.
 

 BODY SNATCHED

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Matthew Dow Smith (art), Charles Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 10 - 11
COVER DATES: October - November 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Agent 99 - Dog of War
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
The Child of Time
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

The Trans-Universal Union in the 45th Century, a futuristic post office, and the Doctor picks up a letter from the Horse Lord of Khan asking for help. He has been locked up on the hospital asteroid Bedlam. The TARDIS arrives and the Doctor explains that all the patients are biogrowers, perfect servants grown from pods. However, the biogrowers bodies live for a hundred years, but their brains die after fifty, leaving them in a catatonic state. That is when they are shipped to Bedlam. Passing themselves off  as auditors from homeworld, the Doctor, Amy and Rory meet Dr Rubin. Nurse Hella takes Rory and Amy to examine the biogrowers and she explains that Rubin has devised a means to transfer living minds into the biogrowers’ empty brains. Sneaking away to intensive care, Amy discovers biogrowers who have had a variety of aliens transferred into their minds, including the Horse Lord of Khan, who explains that he wrote a letter to the Doctor but never sent it - Sol Rubin must have sent it to lure the Time Lord here. Rory, meanwhile, realises that the biogrowers aren’t as vegetative as everyone insists and two minds inhabiting the same body could lead to a riot. He and Amy race to warn the Doctor, but the Doctor is already aware of Rubin’s scheme, as Rubin plans to transfer the Doctor’s mind into a biogrower body and then inhabit the Doctor’s body himself. However, as Amy and Rory race to stop the experiment, Amy and the Doctor both touch the transference machine at the same time. This creates a feedback surge throughout the hospital and the shockwave awakens the duel personalities in all the test subjects. The subjects begin to riot as Rory helps the Doctor and Amy back to the TARDIS. There he realises that they have swapped bodies, and with the transference machine destroyed, there may be no way back.

The biogrowers had twin demands, but I can't work out what they could be...

Amy’s mind in the Doctor’s head is dangerous. They have a limited time to set things right. Rubin claims he has a second mind transference device on Bedlam, and he will switch them back if they help him control the riot. The rioters, meanwhile, decide to storm the reactor. Realising that Rubin was sedating the biogrowers with ethylene and that this might stop the rioting, Nurse Hella organises an ethylene reaction through Rubin’s backup network, but the biogrowers seize the reactor and threaten to destroy the complex unless all the human staff submit themselves for body transfer. Khan finds the Doctor and accompanies Rubin as he crosses the asteroid to another lab to complete the ethylene reaction. However, someone has deactivated the forcefield protecting the walkway between the two buildings and Rubin suffocates leaving Khan to cross alone. There he informs the Doctor that it was he all along who lured the Doctor here intending to inhabit his body. He will be immortal. The biogrowers, meanwhile, initiate the self-destruct sequence on the reactor. Amy in the Doctor’s body has a respiratory bypass system and uses it to cross to the second control room where she knocks Khan unconscious and reactivates the forcefield allowing the others to cross in safety. Rory and Hella fire the ethylene pulse just as the reactor countdown reaches zero. The biogrowers are returned to their vegetative state, the network reboots and the energy build up is routed through the transference machine, switching Amy and the Doctor back into their own bodies. Nurse Hella will remain on Bedlam, removing the alien minds from the biogrowers and housing them in artificial housing until bodies can be cloned. The biogrowers will then be slowly awoken and reintegrated into society.

Issue 10 Cover A
Issue 10 Cover RI
Issue 11 Cover B
'Graphic novel' It Came from Outer Space, 2012
Issue 10 Cover B
Issue 11 Cover A
Issue 11 Cover RI

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
An engrossing and slightly chilling first half gives way to far too much technobabble and a twist that both fails to convince and fails to ramp up the tension, as it is resolved with a simple punch. The artwork is serviceable but not terribly appealing.
 

 SILENT KNIGHT

Issue 12 Cover A
Issue 12 Cover B
Eleventh248

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Paul Grist (art), Phil Elliott (colour)
PRODUCTION ASSISTANCE: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUE: 12
COVER DATE: December 2011
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Harvest of Doom - Humans Aren’t Just for Christmas
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
The Child of Time - The Chains of Olympus
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 3: It Came from Outer Space, January 2012.

Landing in a snowy landscape, the Doctor soon discovers Santa Claus beset by roboforms who want to steal his sack. The Doctor and Santa destroy a couple of roboforms but the remaining ones make off with his sack in a small ship. The Doctor and Santa give chase in a reindeer-pulled sleigh. When they are close enough, the Doctor sonics the roboform with the sack and he drops it allowing Santa to retrieve the toys. This exhausts the sonic screwdriver. Worse, Santa’s reindeer are in a bad way following the chase, so the Doctor offers to help Santa deliver all his gifts by TARDIS instead, including one for Amy and Rory. After another brief encounter with the roboform, Santa gives the Doctor a special present - a brand new sonic screwdriver.

Issue 12 Cover RI

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
I usually complain about Paul Grist’s artwork, but here it is perfectly suited to the story and works extremely well. There is only one line of dialogue in the whole strip - inevitably the Doctor wishing a happy Christmas to ‘all of you at  home’ - but as a festive diversion, this is all good fun. By the way, this is not the first time Santa has appeared in the comic strip as he also met the First Doctor in A Christmas Story.
 

 AS TIME GOES BY

Issue 13 Cover A
Issue 13 Cover RI
Issue 14 Cover B
Issue 15 Cover A
Issue 15 Cover RI
Issue 16 Cover B
Series 2 Volume 4 As Time Goes By
Issue 13 Cover B
Issue 14 Cover A
Issue 14 Cover RI
Issue 15 Cover B
Issue 16 Cover A
Issue 16 Cover RI
The Doctor was quite tired, apparently...

SCRIPT: Joshua Hale Fialkov
ART: Matthew Dow Smith (art), Charlie Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 13 - 16
COVER DATE: January - April 2012
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Humans Aren’t Just for Christmas - Finders Keepers
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
The Chains of Olympus
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Doctor Who II Volume 4: As Time Goes By, June 2012.

Landing in Casablanca in 1941 where the Doctor wants to buy a fez, Rory is soon arrested on suspicion of the theft of confidential documents and murder. Going to the cafe to speak to the police captain, the Doctor and Amy are in time to see Nazis enter, a shot ring out and a man get arrested. Amy’s pleas for Rory’s release fall on deaf ears, but the Captain insists instead on showing her and the Doctor the nightlife of Casablanca. Rory, meanwhile, shares a cell with the man arrested in the cafe. The Captain receives news of the deaths of two men in the prison, Rory being one of them. However, when the actual plan to kill the two men is belatedly carried out, Rory temporarily scuppers it and, though his cellmate is shot, he reveals one of his would-be assassins as Silurians in human guise. Running through a strange fog to save her husband, Amy arrives at the cells, with the Doctor, to find Rory held at gunpoint.

Disabling the assailants with his sonic screwdriver as Rory’s cellmate dies of his wound, the Doctor says that Silurians killing humans so overtly is a very bad thing. He locates a Silurian video log which mentions Project Heavy Air, something the Doctor connects to the strange fog. Leaving Amy and Rory to guard the Silurian prisoners, the Doctor goes to investigate the fog and ends up back at the cafe. Talking to the police captain, he tells him of the attempted invasion by the Silurians and then takes him back to the cells to prove it, but all they find locked up are Amy and Rory with a station filled with Silurians, and the Captain is one too. He proposes, to avoid unnecessary bloodshed, making Amy queen of the new Silurian Empire.

The Silurian/Nazi disco was a surprising success...

The Doctor and Rory escape the Silurians using their own underground travel discs, but the discs only take them to some freshly dug tunnels close to the surface. The Doctor realises that the Silurians plan to destroy Casablanca with a massive earthquake. Amy, meanwhile, is imprisoned by the captain in a police van, but the Doctor and Rory rescue her and explain the Silurian plan to turn the fog they have created into torrential rain which will cause the tunnels beneath the city to collapse causing earthquakes and tidal waves. Cornered by the Captain, the Doctor realises he cannot bring himself to destroy the humans because he has realised that humans are an equal species. He begins to help them, but is arrested as a traitor to the Silurian cause. His replacement pulls the lever to start the deluge.

Escaping custody, the Doctor, Amy and Rory head down into the Earth to deactivate the rain-making machine. While Amy and Rory distract the guards, the Doctor comes face to face with a Silurian scientist. However, he cannot talk him out of activating the plan, but he has already re-routed the ventilation system to flood the underground chambers. The Silurian guards flee back to their underground city leaving tunnels going straight down which will flood the city and kill hundreds of thousands of Silurians, but the Doctor does some technical trickery that somehow re-routes the water through the TARDIS. He sends the Silurian scientist back to his people having convinced him that it is not yet time for the Silurians to emerge.

The Doctor prayed it was a truncheon he could feel in the small of his back...

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
The ‘A’ covers are very nice, especially the first and third ones, but the interior artwork doesn’t even come close to so effectively evoking the time and place, and the look and feel of Casablanca (the film or the place) and is often staggeringly crude. The story isn’t bad and contains some excitement as well as presenting the Silurians as individuals rather than rubber-suited monsters, though I can’t see how the destruction of Casablanca will cause the extinction of all life on Earth. The ending I found extremely confusing and I’m not even convinced that I’ve summarised it correctly as I have no idea what the Doctor actually does. Threading in the events of the film Casablanca is clever, but ultimately just confusing for anyone who hasn’t seen it, resulting in panels and occurrences that appear to have no bearing on the plot.
 

 ASSIMILATION2

SCRIPT: Scott and David Tipton with Tony Lee
ART: J. K. Woodward (art, 1-3, colour, 4-8), The Sharp Brothers (art, 3), Gordon Purcell (pencils, 4-8)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee and Robbie Robbins (1-6), Tom B. Long (7-8)
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton, Jacen Smith (editorial assists)

ISSUES: 1 - 8
COVER DATE: May - December 2012
ON TV: Asylum of the Daleks - The Angels Take Manhattan, The Snowmen
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Buying Time - Snowball!
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE:
Sticks and Stones - Imaginary Enemies
REPRINTS: Reprinted by IDW in the ‘graphic novel’ 
Star Trek: The Next Generation/Doctor Who Assimilation2, Volumes 1 & 2, October 2012 and February 2013.

Delta IV in the United Federation of Planets is attacked and quickly overrun by a combined force of Borg and Cybermen. Only the Prime Minister escapes. The Doctor, Amy and  Rory, meanwhile, are in Ancient Egypt in the Pharaoh’s palace exposing the pharaoh’s vizier as an escaped alien criminal. The Doctor traps it in an interdimensional prison cell. After an exceptionally rough landing, the TARDIS next takes them to what appears to be San Francisco, 1941, but the Doctor’s attention is caught by a pale faced android (Data).

The Cybermen with next of kin...

The Enterprise is on a routine visit to Naia VII. Commander Riker beams down with Worf and Data and meets Captain Ochoa and the amphibian natives the Dai-ai. They tour the mining operation, a difficult and dangerous endeavour as most of the planet is under water, but Captain Picard reveals that they need the minerals urgently in the war effort against the Borg. Back aboard the Enterprise, Riker, Data and Doctor Beverley Crusher go to test the new holodeck. Here, in a bar, they meet the Doctor, Amy and Rory, who they suspect to be glitches in the upgraded system. However, deactivating the hologram reveals them to be real. The Doctor is confused - memories he never had and information he never knew are suddenly in his head. Whilst he and his companions meet Captain Picard, the Enterprise picks up a distress call from Delta IV. As they draw closer they are able to pick up visual sensor transmissions showing a huge fleet of Borg and Cybermen ships.

The Enterprise beats a hasty retreat with the enemy ships in pursuit. The Doctor fills Picard in on the Cybermen and Data finds a log entry detailing an encounter between Captain James T. Kirk and the Cybermen on Aprilia III where they were assisted by a man known as the Doctor. The Doctor suddenly remembers this encounter whilst simultaneously remembers not remembering it. In pursuit of some answers, Picard takes him to meet Guinan.

Retro...
Issue 1 Cover AIssue 1 Cover B
Issue 1 Cover RIAIssue 1 Cover RIB
Issue 1 Cover RE(1)Issue 1 Cover RE(2)
Issue 2 Cover AIssue 2 Cover B

Guinan has a feeling that she and the Doctor know each other but that they shouldn’t. They both sense that the flow of time is disturbed. The Cybermen have brought two universes together to make an alliance with the Borg. The Borg-Cyberman fleet has changed course, now heading away from Earth, after partly assimilating Cogen V. The Enterprise heads to this world and the away team is accompanied by the Doctor and his companions. However, after beaming down, they come under attack from a sentry drone of neither Borg or Cyberman design and find large numbers of Borg and Cybermen casualties. The Doctor deactivates the machine and takes it back to the Enterprise along with Borg and Cybermen bodies for analysis. Study shows that the two forces turned on each other and video from the sentry drone confirms this. They discover Borg ships, all destroyed. Picard and Riker are impressed by the Cybermen, sensing an ally, but the Doctor urges caution. When the Borg contact the Enterprise asking for an alliance against the Cybermen the Doctor is keen to entertain before the Cybermen overrun everything, but Picard is adamant.

The Doctor and Guinan attempt to change Picard’s mind, and ultimately succeed, with Amy’s help, by taking him into the future in the TARDIS to show him the fall of the Klingon and Vulcan empires and the ultimate fall of Earth.

The Doctor, Amy, Rory, Picard, Riker, Worf and Data beam down to desolate planetoid Tau Lee where they meet a party of Borg led by Conduit and agree to be allies against the Cybermen. The Doctor outlines a plan to catch up with the Cyberfleet heading towards the Borg homeworld and restore the Borg’s executive library that was destroyed by the Cybermen and which has rendered most of the collective inert. To get a copy of the library, he proposes travelling back in time. With Picard and the ship’s counsellor, the Doctor goes to Naia VII to try to get supplies of gold, an effective weapon against the Cybermen, but the humans are unable to help as their agreement with the Dai-ai prevents them from mining for it. Picard begins talks with Seelos, leader of the Dai-ai, but it is the Doctor who swings the deal before travelling back in time with Amy and Rory to the Battle of Wolf 539. There, aboard a Borg cube, they encounter Captain Picard assimilated into the Borg collective as Locutus.

That's one hell of a convention panel...

Locutus ignores the time travellers and they proceed through the Borg ship to a computer terminal where the Doctor copies the executive libraries. As the battle begins, the travellers slip back to the TARDIS and return to the Enterprise. Geordi the engineer has bad news, though, as, despite Borg enhancements suggested by Conduit, the Enterprise cannot achieve sufficient speed to catch the Cyberman fleet before it reaches the Borg homeworld. However, the Doctor suggests boarding the Cybership in the TARDIS. Once aboard, though, they are detected almost immediately despite splitting into two parties and soon find themselves up against the collected might of the Cybermen.

Aboard the Borg cube-ship-thing...

Worf’s party, which includes Amy and Rory, attacks the engine room and manages to disable the engines. The Doctor’s party, meanwhile, which includes Conduit, Picard and Data, is captured by the Cybermen, but they are rescued by the arrival of the Enterprise firing a gold-infused particle beam. This destroys the Cybermen but not the Cybercontroller who is instead restrained by Data and Conduit. This allows the Doctor to restore the Borg executive libraries. Immediately, the Borg set all Cyberships to self-destruct. They all race back to the TARDIS before the fleet explodes, but then Conduit announces an end to the alliance and attempts to assimilate the TARDIS. However, the TARDIS retreats from the attack, entering Data. Data fights back then Rory and Worf physically throw Conduit into the time vortex, ending the threat. With the Cybermen destroyed, the universes revert to the way they should be and the Doctor, Amy and Rory depart for their own universe.

Cyberborg? Borgermen? You decide...

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
I have never been a fan of crossovers (as various reviews in the Seventh Doctor section demonstrate) and I am absolutely not a fan of Star Trek in any of its incarnations. Doctor Who has always been about rebellion and questioning authority, whereas to my mind Star Trek is about enforcing authority. It’s about responsible people in uniforms. However, the writers here seem to have realised this fundamental difference between the two shows and used it to inform their story and the characterisation. In essence, it’s rather like the Doctor teaming up with UNIT, but fundamentally UNIT up to the end of Season 7, where the characters can carry respect equal to that afforded to the Doctor. The Doctor may denounce the Star Trek ethos of entering a situation armed, but Worf is allowed the equally persuasive counter-argument and convinces Amy and Rory to carry guns. Some instalments are a bit thin on plot and meaningful incident and the showdown with the Cybercontroller is rather spoiled by the fact that he talks completely out of character, but it all feels remarkably solid and remains entertaining throughout.

The artwork is a bit of a mixed bag. The first three issues are obviously heavily photo-referenced. Things change when Gordon Purcell takes over pencilling duties but, though he can turn in some exceptional work, some of the panels look slightly rushed and lack the accuracy that would have made them stand out. His likeness of Whoopie Goldberg is particularly poor in Issue 4. The flashback to the 1960s incarnation of Star Trek has a pleasingly simplistic style perfectly in keeping with the period ably assisted by accurate and sympathetic colour work.

Over all then, a surprisingly successful venture.
 

Issue 2 Cover RIAIssue 2 Cover RIB
Issue 3 Cover AIssue 3 Cover B
Issue 3 Cover RIIssue 4 Cover A
Issue 4 Cover BIssue 4 Cover RI
Issue 5 RegularIssue 5 Cover RI
Issue 6 RegularIssue 6 RI
Issue 7 RegularIssue 7 RI
Issue 8 RegularIssue 8 Cover RIIssue 8 Cover RE
Graphic Novel Volume 1Graphic Novel Volume 2
   Doctor Who Annual 2012

 IN-FEZ-STATION

Doctor Who Annual 2012

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
The Fez Sacred Music Festival is a real event, everything else in this strip is pretty much nonsense. The sonic screwdriver can affect something on a planet-wide basis? The Slitheen have convinced the entire population to wear fezzes? Actually, I can believe the first of those more than the second. The art is crude.
 

A Slitheen armed with a ridiculous plan...

SCRIPT: Len Wein
ART: Matthew Dow Smith (art) Adrian Salmon (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: None

The TARDIS lands in the city of Fez in Morocco where the Doctor has come to see the centuries-old Festival of Sacred Music. He notices that everyone, women included, is wearing a fez, and Amy and Rory are soon given one each by a large, farting gentleman. When the music begins, anyone wearing the fez becomes hypnotised and starts walking towards the festival hall, Amy and Rory included. The Doctor tries to interfere but gets knocked out as a result. When he recovers he is tied to a chair in a back room and his opponents are revealed to be the Slitheen. They plan to destroy humanity using sympathetic vibrations. Despite the Doctor’s warning, all around the world, controlled humans begin to sing, searching for the correct destructive note, but the Doctor has used his sonic screwdriver to alter the key frequency so that it no longer affects humans. It does, however, affect the Slitheen and, all around the world, they explode, ending the threat.

 TIME FRAUD

Chanchellery guards? Maybe not...

SCRIPT: Richard Dinnick
ART: Josh Adams (art) Charlie Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: None

Cuzco, Peru, 1992, two land developers are scared by the sudden appearance of what they believe to be an angry Incan ghost. Meanwhile, en route to Florana, the TARDIS becomes trapped in a time corridor. Elsewhere on the planet Helion, the bird-like Ra’ra’vis are celebrating the approaching Solstice of Pajaro, which heals their elderly and sick, by preparing to travel in time. However, as Entek, the King’s son is transferred, there is a malfunction. Unable to locate Entek, scientist Tigil suggests contacting the Time Lords for help. The Doctor, meanwhile, has found the end of the time corridor in Peru and there found Entek. However, when he contacts Helion to let the Ra’ra’vis know that Entek is safe and to offer his help with their time machine they tell him they already have assistance from Gallifrey. Travelling there directly, the Doctor is almost arrested by chancellery guards under the command of Castellan Bond. He, Entek, Amy and Rory run and take

shelter in an abandoned building, but the guards find them. The Doctor uses his sonic screwdriver to reveal them not as Time Lords but as Gizou, shapeshifting mercenaries who have been forced into criminal activity because of a terminal disease affecting their people. The Doctor arranges for the sick Gizou to share in the healing power of the solstice if they turn against Bond. They do so and Bond is revealed as a time agent called Captain Scott Thrower who infected the Gizou in the first place. All he wants is to use the solstice to rejuvenate himself. However, the Doctor with help from the Gizou has tinkered with the solstice energy and Thrower is reverted to a boy. He attempts to use his vortex manipulator and is apparently vaporised. However, he is instead transported to Scotland in 1965. Here he is found by Captain Jack who takes him as one of the twelve children destined to be a gift to the 456.

Doctor Who Annual 2012

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
The final twist is perhaps a continuity-laden twist too far, but this story delights in some great plot twists prior to this, cramming a lot of story into its fifteen pages. The artwork is crisp with excellent likenesses. A very likeable strip.
 

 ESCAPE INTO ALCATRAZ

Doctor Who Annual 2012

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
I can see what the artwork is trying to do here, but it’s ugly, inconsistent and sometimes distracts from the actual story. There are a few frames where Matt Smith is impossible to recognise and even the alien blowfish (quite a distinctive look) changes from panel to panel. The actual story isn’t bad, though it’s never clear why the Doctor goes to all this effort to save Mako. Must have been a quiet week for alien invasions.
 

SCRIPT: Tony Lee
ART: Mitch Gerads (art and colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: None

Alcatraz, 1962, and the Doctor is thrown into a cell with a disguised alien called Mako. Mako is hiding out because he owes money to the wrong Silurian, but the Doctor knows there is a bounty on his head and a riot the following week will see Mako as one of the victims. The Doctor travelled back to the time of Alcatraz’s construction and fitted a secret tunnel from the cell at the end of which is concealed a box containing special glasses that show the true form of everything in Alcatraz. Unfortunately when he puts them on, the Doctor realises that all of the guards are alien hitmen. Knowing it will take time to build his device to get them out, he goes to speak to Madman Malone, the king of Alcatraz, and convinces him to help. He finishes his device just as Mako is taken away. Activating it reveals the alien’s true form and Malone begins a riot. In the chaos, the Doctor and Makos flee to the sub-basement where they discover the real prison warden and officers. They make it out of Alcatraz by swimming to the shore. Next day’s newspaper states that Mako died in the riot, good enough for the hitmen to claim their reward without actually having to kill him. Mako thanks the Doctor and takes his leave.

What a great bumper sticker this would make...

 EAGLE OF THE REICH

Eleventh479

SCRIPT: Andy Diggle
ART: Mark Buckingham (art), Charlie Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

REPRINTS: None

Landing at the Crystal Palace, London, in 1936, the Doctor is keen to discover what drew them off course. He meets with Dr Sophie Renard of the Societe Archeologique who is searching for the lost pneumatic railway. The Doctor leads her straight to it and there discovers the body of Thomas Webster Rammell clutching a glowing sphere. Dr Renard pulls a gun and the Doctor exposes her as Professor Kriemhilde Steiner of the Nazi Black Science Division. She has been searching for the sphere - the eagle of Ultima Thule - as the ultimate power source, the key to the thousand-year Reich. The Doctor urges her not to touch the sphere, which he says is an energy-draining phoenix egg, the thing which dragged them off course. A game of football ensues between ‘Brits’ and German, but just as Steiner gets the ‘ball’ it hatches, incinerating her and setting fire to the palace. The Doctor promises to show Rory and Amy the building in its heyday (which he does here).

Doctor Who Annual 2012

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Eye-rollingly bad. Somehow made worse by the pneumatic railway material and its creator being loosely based on fact. Definitely made worse by a football match between Brits and Germans, especially as the Doctor has just said not to touch the sphere. The artwork’s not bad, though, even if it does have the Photoshop filter feel to it. This strip is riddled with clichés, but, of course, the Great Exhibition is hardly an original setting for a Doctor Who comic strip anyway, having featured in the Tenth Doctor DWA strip The Crystal Palace (also set in 1936 and featuring the fire) and Seventh Doctor strip Claws of the Klathi!
 

   Doctor Who (US)

 HYPOTHETICAL GENTLEMAN

Hypothetical Gentleman is called away...

SCRIPT: Andy Diggle
ART: Mark Buckingham (art), Charlie Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 1 - 2
COVER DATE: September - October 2012
ON TV: Asylum of the Daleks - The Angels Take Manhattan
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Terror from the Swamp - The Greedy Gulper
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
Sticks and Stones - The Cornucopia Caper
REPRINTS: Reprinted in Hypothetical Gentleman, Series 3 Volume 1, March 2013 (cover as for Issue 1 Cover A).

London 1851, and a seance ends in Emily, the medium, being exposed as a fake. The TARDIS lands in the city and the Doctor, Amy and Rory set off for the Great Exhibition. Emily and her husband Charles have previously experiences an alien visitation and tonight they experience another one as Emily is possessed but she fails to draw the machine that will mean their salvation. Using the psychic paper, the Doctor and the Ponds enter the Great Exhibition, despite it being the middle of the night and a day before it officially  opens. They are just in time to hear a scream and discover a policeman frozen in time. He is right in front of a Quantum Resonator, an alien object that opens windows into hypothetical worlds - a glimpse of what might have been. The exhibition records state that the Resonator was built by Emily and Charles and they are brought to the Crystal Palace. Emily reveals herself to be a telepath. During her first visitation, she drew detailed plans which allowed Charles to build the Resonator. Looking at the blueprints the Doctor sees an artron capacitor. Using the sonic screwdriver, he is able to pick up a trace of artron energy in the vicinity. Emily has a seizure and Rory stays behind to tend to her while the Doctor and Amy race off to locate the source of the artron emission - which leads them directly to the TARDIS. Rory, meanwhile, is attacked by a figure that steps from the Quantum Resonator.

Emily confronts the figure and asks it to reveal what is inside it, but what it shows is the Doctor’s past. The Doctor and Amy, meanwhile, realise that the TARDIS is not where they left it and, powered by the TARDIS, the Resonator could punch a hole between realities. The figure attacks Charles before melting away. The TARDIS arrives and the Doctor promises to make everything right. The figure has been trying to make himself real by stealing time from his victims. Someone hijacked the TARDIS’ circuits to send the blueprints to Emily, knowing that the Doctor would return to 1851. Somebody is toying with the Doctor. He builds a synchronisation cage, a device for trapping the figure, but the figure appears before he has a chance to activate it. The blueprints were written in High Gallifreyan and as the Doctor demands answers, the figure grabs him and begins to absorb abundant time energy, enough to make him real. But Amy attacks the Resonator with a chair, causing it to explode and dragging the figure back into hypothetical space. As he vanishes, Rory, the policeman and Charles all unfreeze, but the Doctor is left with unanswered questions about the figure’s identity. However, as the TARDIS departs, we see the face of the figure reflected in the central column.

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
IDW’s numbering is hardly the simplest thing in the world, and did we really need six covers for the first issue, especially as all bar one of them have nothing to do with the content? The script by Andy Diggle is extremely good, beautifully setting up a story arc with lots of tantalising clues but giving us enough substance and structure right here and now to make this a satisfying story in its own right. Charles and Emily are well characterised and the period is nicely evoked in the words. However, whilst the artwork is sometimes extremely good, it is all too often muddily coloured and has a tendency to look like someone just took some photos from Doctor Who and put them through a Photoshop art filter. Were the artwork as evocative as the story, this would be a classic Doctor Who comic strip.
 

Issue 1  Cover AIssue 1 Cover RIA
Issue 1 Cover RIBIssue 1 Cover RE(1)
Issue 1 Cover RE(2)Issue 1 Cover RE(3)
Issue 2 Regular CoverIssue 2 Cover RI

 THE DOCTOR AND THE NURSE

Issue 3 Cover AIssue 3 Cover RI
Issue 4 Cover AIssue 4 Cover RI

ALTERED VISTAS SAYS:
Absurd though it may sound, the London Beer Flood did indeed happen in 1814, drowning or fatally wounding eight people and destroying two houses and crumbling the walls of the Tavistock Arms Pub. The synopsis of this story doesn’t really do it justice because it’s not so much what happens but the way that it happens and the interactions between the Doctor and Rory that make it work. The art in the first issue solely by Philip Bond is excellent, reminiscent of Roger Langridge at his very best. It’s still good when Ilias Kyriazis takes over, but it’s more like Mike Austin; not quite as crisp and the likenesses aren’t as precise.
 

SCRIPT: Brandon Seifert
ART: Philip Bond/Ilias Kyriazis (art), Charlie Kirchoff (colour)
LETTERING: Shawn Lee/Tom B. Long
EDITOR: Denton J. Tipton

ISSUES: 3 - 4
COVER DATE: November - December 2012
ON TV: The Snowmen
IN DOCTOR WHO ADVENTURES: 
Meteorite Meeting - Snowball!
IN DOCTOR WHO MAGAZINE
Sticks and Stones - The Cornucopia Caper
REPRINTS: Reprinted in Hypothetical Gentleman, Series 3 Volume 1, March 2013 (cover as for Hypothetical Gentleman Issue 1 Cover A shown above).

The TARDIS lands aboard Dunlop Station, orbiting 70 Virginis B, but immediately dematerialises to reappear in London, England 1588. Several other locations follow, but the Doctor and Rory are lost and Amy is going to kill them. A few hours previously, they were involved in a life or death situation with the Siblinghood of Saint Augustine, Physicist on Hipponensis 3 in 7213AD. They made it back to the ship. but Rory and the Doctor were soon arguing about the Doctor’s irresponsible attitude to danger. Amy decided they needed time together to bond, so when the TARDIS landed in London 1814 she deposited them in a pub (which for some reason seemed significant to the Doctor, though he couldn’t remember why) and went sightseeing. Only trouble is, the Doctor and Rory decided to  cheat. hop aboard the TARDIS and come back at the end of the night to pick Amy up but now cannot get back to the right time and place. Amy, meanwhile, bored in 1814, sees an anachronistically dressed man wearing an eye drive who she decides to follow. Attempting to escape a tar pit in California 35,000 years ago, the Doctor suddenly realises the significance of 1814 - the year of the London Beer Flood - something Amy sees first hand as a brewery, sabotaged by the man with the eye drive, explodes.

Surviving the beer tsunami, Amy locates the man with the eye drive. The Doctor meanwhile recharges the TARDIS in Cardiff as all the short hops have drained its energy reserves. Unfortunately he becomes embroiled in an attack by Cybermen and he and Rory end up trapped in space with only seven minutes left to live. Working with Rory, he begins to formulate a plan for escape. Amy holds the Silence agent at gunpoint. He tells her the Beer Flood was a fixed point always destined to happen before vanishing. Amy reads that fifteen people died during the disaster and, realising that the event is fixed but the deathtoll is not, sets about changing the figure. The Doctor and Rory set up camp on the moon while the TARDIS recovers, but another attempt to get them back to Amy puts them down on the right day in the wrong country. Rory persuades the Doctor to play it safe and just fly the TARDIS to London. Amy is livid

Not King Kong. Just an ordinary-sized gorilla...

MORE COMIC STRIP EXPLOITS FROM THE ELEVENTH DOCTOR TO FOLLOW IN A FUTURE UPDATE.

JUMP TO ANOTHER ELEVENTH DOCTOR ARTICLE

Doctor Who AdventuresDoctor Who Magazine

GO TO INDEX

GO TO TIMELINE

BACK TO TOP

JUMP TO ANOTHER ARTICLE

First DoctorSecond DoctorThird DoctorFourth DoctorFifth DoctorSixth Doctor
Seventh DoctorEighth DoctorNinth DoctorTenth DoctorEleventh DoctorDoctorless